Post 8: Closed Syllable Spelling Patterns

When teaching students about Closed Syllables, it is important to include lessons on spelling patterns. There are several related patterns that are easy for students to learn and can help their overall spelling.

‘ck’ pattern

  • in a one-syllable word, use ‘ck’ to represent the /k/ sound after a single short vowel
  • e.g., stick, rock, stack
  • note: the /k/ sound needs to come immediately after the vowel, so do not use ‘ck’ if there is another sound in between the vowel and the /k/ sound e.g., silk, ask, blink

FLOSS pattern

  • double the f, l and s in a single syllable word after a single short vowel
  • e.g., class, staff, will
  • note: the word “floss” can help students remember because it has an ‘f’, an ‘l’ and an ‘s’ in it
  • common exceptions: if, has, this, his, yes, bus

‘tch’ pattern

  • in a one-syllable word, use ‘tch’ to represent the /ch/ sound after a single short vowel
  • e.g., itch, catch, fetch
  • note: the /ch/ sound needs to come immediately after the vowel, so do not use ‘tch’ if there is another sound between the vowel and the /ch/ sound e.g., bench, lunch, inch
  • common exceptions: exceptions can be remembered with “WORM Sandwich”, which stands for the exception words “which, rich, much, such and sandwich”

‘dge’ pattern

  • in a one-syllable word, use ‘dge’ to represent the /j/ sound after a single short vowel
  • e.g., edge, ridge, fudge
  • note: the /j/ sound needs to come immediately after the vowel, so do not use ‘dge’ if there is another sound between the vowel and the /j/ sound e.g., hinge, bulge

Doubling Pattern (also knows as the 1-1-1 pattern)

Double the final consonant when you add a suffix beginning with a vowel to:

  • a 1 syllable word
  • with 1 short vowel
  • followed by only 1 consonant
  • e.g., run + ing = running, stop + ed = stopped

Students need a lot of practice with this one. One great way to practice is through games, so I’ve attached a game below. Enjoy!

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